ACT in the UK symposium, BABCP National Conference Edinburgh 2008

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy had more of a presence at the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies National Conference this year, with pre-conference and half-day workshops, and several symposia on ACT and ACT-related research. Also, for those interested in the broader contextual approach to CBT there were workshops and symposia on Behavioural Activation, as well as a keynote speech by Christopher Martell on “Twenty Years of Behavior Therapy: Trends and Counter Trends”. It seemed that, compared to recent BABCP conferences, there was much more on offer for the behaviour analytically inclined clinician.

I participated in the ACT in the UK symposium, which was held on Saturday morning. The details of the presenters are below. Unfortunately Frank Bond was unable to present at the symposium as scheduled; similarly so for Tom Ricketts, although Giselle Brook presented in his place. The powerpoint presentations as well as audio are available for each presenter.

Saturday 19th July 2008, BABCP National Conference Edinburgh

Acceptance & Commitment Therapy: ACT in the UK
Convenor: Simon Houghton, Sheffield Care Trust, UK

Chair: Joe Curran, Sheffield Care Trust, UK

Group ACT for OCD: Development of the approach and initial findings

Tom Ricketts, Sheffield Care Trust, UK. Presenter: Giselle Brook  [Presentation (.ppt)  Audio (.mp3) ]

Abstract:

A significant proportion of clients with OCD are known not to respond to traditional exposure and response prevention (ERP) with alternative treatments such as cognitive therapy pr medication seeming to offer little additional benefit. A group treatment based on ACT was developed and delivered to a number of clients that had failed to respond to ERP. This presentation will describe the group process and report the initial clinical outcomes of this approach.

Measuring psychological flexibility and mindfulness skills with people who hear distressing voices

Eric Morris, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London & South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, UK  [Presentation (.ppt)  Audio (.mp3) ]

Abstract:

This study involved validating the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) with a sample of people who hear distressing and disabling voices. The relationships of psychological flexibility and mindfulness skills with general distress, social functioning, topography of voices, symptom distress, beliefs about voices, and thought control strategies are explored.

Living successfully with pain: The role of illness representations, catastrophising and acceptance in chronic pain functioning

Sujata Bose & Tammy Spencer, NHS Tayside, UK; David Gillanders, University of Edinburgh, UK (presenter)    [Presentation (.ppt)  Audio (.mp3) ]

Abstract:

Background: Psychological factors are known to influence adjustment to chronic pain. Beliefs or appraisals relating to pain, as well as catastrophising responses to pain have both been found to influence adjustment. Recent research has shown the importance of acceptance in living successfully with pain. Acceptance is a behavioural construct defined as willingness to experience pain whilst continuing to engage in important activities. The present study examined how appraisals relating to chronic pain interact with the processes of catastrophising and acceptance to influence physical and emotional functioning.

Method: 153 individuals attending NHS pain clinics and pain support groups completed validated questionnaires measuring appraisals of chronic pain, catastrophising, acceptance and emotional and physical function. Path analyses were conducted to investigate direct and moderated relationships between pain related appraisals, catastrophising, acceptance and emotional and physical functioning.

Results: A range of direct and moderated relationships are described, with important differences between the psychological variables associated with emotional dysfunction and physical dysfunction. Whist some direct relationships between appraisals and both emotional and physical functioning were observed, catastrophising moderated the relationship between appraisals, acceptance and emotional functioning. By contrast, acceptance moderated the relationship between appraisals, catastrophising, and physical functioning.

Discussion: The findings suggest that different psychological processes many underlie successful emotional and physical functioning in chronic pain. Interestingly, appraisals relating to the controllability of pain do not show significant relationships with either emotional or physical functioning. The clinical and theoretical implications of the results are discussed, as are directions for further research.

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Filed under Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, CBT, cognitive behavioural therapy, Mental Health, Psychology, United Kingdom

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